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This blog is to highlight the unjust persecution of legitimate non-TV users at the hands of TV Licensing. These people do not require a licence and are entitled to live without the unnecessary stress and inconvenience caused by TV Licensing's correspondence and employees.

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Wednesday, 29 January 2014

TV Licensing Compensation Payments - Claim Yours Today

As regular readers will be aware, TV Licensing frequently get things wrong.

That news should come as no surprise at all, in the same week that we wrote about another rogue TV Licensing employee telling lies and acting aggressively towards the occupier of a legally-licence-free property.

Some readers may be unaware, however, that TV Licensing actually has a policy for compensating those "customers" that experience a level of service "falling short of (their) own high standards". They refer to these as "goodwill payments", as any mention of "compensation" would be an acknowledgement of their wrongdoing. TV Licensing, just like their BBC puppet masters, rarely admit their mistakes or show any form of contrition.

Using the Freedom of Information Act 2000, a magnificent piece of legislation, we asked the BBC to provide the following information about TV Licensing goodwill/compensation payments:

1. Who is responsible for authorising these goodwill/compensation payments?

2. Any TV Licensing policy documentation that governs the use of goodwill/compensation payments.

3. The number of goodwill/compensation payments authorised by TV Licensing in relation to the conduct of its enforcement or administration activities. Please provide this information as an annual breakdown from 2008 to date.

4. The cumulative annual cost of goodwill/compensation payments disclosed in response to point 3 above.

The BBC's response arrived today and it makes very interesting reading. The BBC, who aren't very good at book balancing, couldn't provide all the data stemming back as far as 2008. The data they did provide is as follows:
  • In 2008 goodwill payments totalling £31,905.54 were made.
  • In 2009 goodwill payments totalling £27,777.40 were made.
  • In 2010 goodwill payments totalling £13,834.23 were made.
  • In 2011 goodwill payments totalling £11,709.20 were made.
  • In 2012 goodwill payments totalling £14,173.89 were made. A total of 1,064 customers were compensated.
  • In 2013 goodwill payments totalling £12,596.79 were made. A total of 825 customers were compensated.
Very helpfully the BBC also provided us with a copy of the TV Licensing Goodwill Guidance, which outlines the circumstances in which compensation is likely to be paid.

The document contains the following impact matrix:


It also gives examples of the types of complaint likely to fall in each category and how they should be dealt with:
  • Very Low Impact Complaints:
    • No amount should be offered.
    • A typical complaint in this category could be a dislike of the call centre hold music or opening times.
  • Low Impact Complaints:
    • Amount offered should be 10 % of the licence fee (£15).
    • A typical complaint in this category could be sending marketing to an address in error despite the customer highlighting this and a valid licence being in place or failing to change an address appropriately despite the error being highlighted by the customer.
  • Medium Impact Complaints:
    • Amount offered should be 20 % of the licence fee (£30).
    • A typical complaint in this category could be where TV Licensing have either breached legislation or guidance in error, or where there is evidence that a member of TV Licensing staff has displayed exceptionally poor service.
  • High Impact Complaints:
    • Amount offered should be 30 % of the licence fee (£45).
    • A typical complaint in this category could be where TV Licensing has carried out a minor data breach or we have threatened to prosecute in error.
  • Very High Impact Complaints:
    • Amount offered should be 50 % of the licence fee (£75).
    • A typical complaint in this category could be where TV Licensing has prosecuted someone in error. This may also be used for minor accidental damage to property which is supported by evidence.
  • Extremely High Impact Complaints:
    • Amount offered should be 100 % of the licence fee (£145).
    • A typical complaint in this category could be inappropriate prosecution, loss of earnings through court attendance or serious data breaches.
The document also explains that TV Licensing may exercise discretion and award larger payments than those mentioned above. We are aware of several cases where they have offered a £200 payment.

Anyone who feels aggrieved by TV Licensing's caustic tone or incompetent employees is advised to complain in the strongest possible terms. It's only fair that the BBC and TV Licensing should pay for their habitual misdeeds!

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3 comments:

Ray Turner said...

An interesting post. Thanks for investigating and sharing this information.

Veg said...


"High Impact Complaints:
Amount offered should be 30 % of the licence fee (£45).
A typical complaint in this category could be where TV Licensing has carried out a minor data breach or we have threatened to prosecute in error."

Does this mean that TVL//crapita/BBC will be including £45 compensation with each threatogram sent to LLF legal occupiers?

I look forward to monthly mailings of £45.00 ......

steven a man said...

great INFO as always, i just sent them a invoice for £5000 AND outlined the costs , to show them exactly why i have invoiced them for this amount, phone calls, research regarding claims that i had block 3 Acts by Mark the customer service specialist ,
(over 40 hours spent researching so i can rebut there claims) postage , printer use , ect ect.
I do not for one minute expect them to pay it, i also attached a data request for all my date they have regarding any phone calls, letters ,visits.
But i will make the court aware that i provided them with a invoice and a list of future fees, when i get them in the magistrates court (small claims)
and i would imagine by that time my invoice will be reaching the £10,000 (small claims max) by that time.