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Thursday, 2 June 2016

TV Licensing in Twitter PR Offensive


In the finest traditions of TV Licensing PR harlotdom, it appears the BBC's revenue generation bullies have shot themself in the arse again.

TV Licensing's latest media offensive focuses on the number of Twitter users posting the words "worth the licence fee" about various BBC programmes.

According to TV Licensing, in the past year the "worth the licence fee" comment has been posted on Twitter:
  • 241 times, in relation to Happy Valley.
  • 492 times, in relation to The Night Manager.
  • 403 times, in relation to The Hunt.
  • 123 times, in relation to Strictly Come Dancing.
  • 166 times, in relation to the BBC Proms.
  • 156 times, in relation to Panorama.
  • 106 times, in relation to DIY SOS.
  • 100 times, in relation to Britain's Forgotten Slave Owners.
  • 106 times, in relation to Line of Duty.
  • 97 times, in relation to War and Peace.
TV Licensing also claim that the words "worth the licence fee" were used, presumably less than 97 times, in relation to several other programmes, including Doctor Forster, Match Of The Day, Springwatch, Dr Who and Crimewatch.

In total, according to TV Licensing, the words "worth the licence fee" have been mentioned 12,000 times between 31st March 2015 and 1st April 2016 - that's about 33 "worth the licence fee" tweets a day, which is actually pretty paltry. Furthermore, using TV Licensing's flawed methodology, a fair few of those tweets probably had the word "not" prefixing "worth the licence fee".

Let's take a closer look at some of the headline figures given by TV Licensing above: 
  • There were 6 episodes of Happy Valley, so the average episode only received about 40 "worth the licence fee" tweets from 9.4m viewers.
  • There were 6 episodes of The Night Manager, so the average episode only received about 82 "worth the licence fee" tweets from 9.9m viewers.
  • There were 7 episodes of The Hunt, so the average episode only received about 58 "worth the licence fee" tweets from 5.1m viewers.
How many times do people tweet about the abysmal level of service provided by TV Licensing? Quite a lot more than post "worth the licence fee" we'd suggest. They also consistently vent their spleen about TV Licensing on a daily basis.

Why not search for TV Licensing on Twitter and see what we mean for yourself?!

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1 comment:

Ray Turner said...

There are lots of things that are worth the licence fee, but few of them are TV programmes broadcast on the BBC...

For instance, I get much better value from my Internet subscription...